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James M. Johannes

jjohannes

Contact James M. Johannes

jjohannes@bus.wisc.edu 608-265-4488

James M. Johannes is associate dean for executive education, Aschenbrener Professor of Banking, and director of the Puelicher Center for Banking Education at the Wisconsin School of Business.

James M. Johannes is associate dean for executive education, Aschenbrener Professor of Banking, and director of the Puelicher Center for Banking Education at the Wisconsin School of Business. Previously, he held positions with the business school as the senior associate dean, associate dean of undergraduate programs, and of administration. He chaired the Department of Finance, Investment, and Banking at the Wisconsin School of Business from 1986-1996. 

His research interests focus on banking and financial institutions and monetary economics and policy. He has published a book on control of the money supply, a strategic planning manual for credit unions, and numerous articles on monetary policy and banking. 

In addition to his teaching duties in the areas of banking and financial institutions at UW-Madison, he was a member of the Economic Forecast Advisory Council of the State of Wisconsin’s Department of Revenue. He has been a faculty representative on UW-Madison’s Athletic Board and the Athletic Board Finance Committee. Johannes chaired the State of Wisconsin Department of Financial Institution’s committee to rewrite the Wisconsin Consumer Act, and was a member of the Governor’s Commission on UW System Compensation. He has served as a faculty member in the Prochnow Graduate School of Banking, the ABA School of Real Estate Finance, CUNA Management School, and the Mortgage Bankers Association School of Mortgage Banking. 

Johannes taught economics at Michigan State University from 1976 to 1983. 

He received his B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Recent Articles and Publications

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November 20, 2013
By James M. Johannes
Barely half of American Meteorological Society meteorologists believe global warming is occurring and humans are the primary cause, a newly released study reveals.

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