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David Blackmon: The Environmental Echo Chamber

April 13, 2017

In this edition of The Heartland Daily Podcast, Forbes columnist David Blackmon joins research fellow Isaac Orr to discuss how the environmental echo chamber distorts the facts of pipelines for their own financial gain.

In this edition of The Heartland Daily Podcast,  Forbes columnist David Blackmon joins research fellow Isaac Orr to discuss how the environmental echo chamber distorts the facts of pipelines for their own financial gain. These groups, which Blackmon refers to as 'conflict groups,' rely on stoking fears of environmental catastrophe to increase donations.

Blackmon dissects a case study where industry and regulators worked together to formulate a plan to fix a leaking pipeline in the Cook Inlet of Alaska. Regulators and industry both agreed to wait until the ice in the Inlet had melted before fixing the underground pipeline because doing so would be safer for the workers involved. This plan was then lambasted by EcoWatch, which distorted the facts of the case for their readership.

Article Tags
Energy Climate Change
Author
Isaac Orr is a policy fellow at the Center of the American Experiment on mining and energy issues.
isaac.orr@americanexperiment.org