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New Jersey's Tangled Hair-braiding Occupational Licensing Laws (Guest: Lee McGrath

August 28, 2018

In this episode of the Daily Podcast, Heartland's Jesse Hathaway talks with Institute for Justice senior legislative counsel Lee McGrath about New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy's (D) fight against common-sense occupational-licensing reforms.

In this episode of the Daily Podcast, Heartland's Jesse Hathaway talks with Institute for Justice senior legislative counsel Lee McGrath about New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy's (D) fight against common-sense occupational-licensing reforms.

Gov. Phil Murphy conditionally vetoed Assembly Bill 3754 (A.B. 3754), a bill that would have let African-style natural hair braiders practice their trade without a government permission slip. Currently, New Jersey braiders must attend least 1,200 hours of cosmetology training, an education that can cost $17,000 in tuition, McGrath says.

A.B. 3754 was approved unanimously in the state's lower and upper legislative chambers. On the very last day for the governor to act before it would have taken effect, almost two months after the Senate approved the bill, Gov. Murphy rejected the bill,  stifling upward mobility for hundreds of minorities and other disadvantaged individuals in the state, McGrath says.

McGrath and Hathaway talk about how 25 states, including Connecticut, Delaware, and Maryland, don’t license natural braiders, discussing how specialty licensing does nothing to protect the public’s health and safety, and only serves throw braiders out of work.

 
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Author
Jesse Hathaway is a policy advisor for budget and tax issues at The Heartland Institute.
media@heartland.org @JesseinOH