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Climate Change
August 23, 2019
U.N. Lies About Food Supplies and Climate Change
Climate Change Weekly #333
Energy
August 23, 2019
Is a Renewable Electric Grid a Mirage?
Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to curb climate change will require enormous sacrifice. The enormity of the required sacrifice suggests that we should have consensus on the goal before acting.
Education
August 22, 2019
Why Go to College?
More than three million students will begin college this year, many pursuing degrees needed for high paying jobs.
More News
Environment
August 22, 2019
The Real News about Climate: CO2 Is No Threat
Climate alarmism does not exemplify the honest pursuit of science. 
Health Care
August 21, 2019
Medicare For All Would Require Huge Tax Hikes On The Middle Class
In many cases, tax burdens would double, and for tens of millions of families, the increased taxes would far outweigh not needing to pay for health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket costs.
Alcohol & Tobacco
August 21, 2019
Vaping Hysteria Will Mean More Tobacco Deaths
When products could save lives, it’s important for people to be informed about those benefits, along with the risks.

All News

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Opinion/Editorial
August 23, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Climate Change Weekly #333
August 23, 2019
By Daniel Sutter
Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to curb climate change will require enormous sacrifice. The enormity of the required sacrifice suggests that we should have consensus on the goal before acting.
August 22, 2019
By Daniel Sutter
More than three million students will begin college this year, many pursuing degrees needed for high paying jobs.
August 22, 2019
By Alan Carlin
Climate alarmism does not exemplify the honest pursuit of science. 
August 21, 2019
By Christopher Talgo
In many cases, tax burdens would double, and for tens of millions of families, the increased taxes would far outweigh not needing to pay for health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket costs.
August 21, 2019
By Jeff Stier
When products could save lives, it’s important for people to be informed about those benefits, along with the risks.
August 21, 2019
By Daniel Sutter
Zoning and land use regulation has largely choked off housing construction in many American cities.  This is an unintended but predictable consequence of requiring government permission for building.
August 21, 2019
By Larry Sand
More than ever, parents must be vigilant regarding what goes on in their child’s school.
August 20, 2019
By Chad Savage
You might have missed this big news because the media largely ignored it, but President Donald Trump signed a historic health care health care executive order (EO) a few weeks ago.
August 19, 2019
By Jim Lakely
Week of August 12, 2019
August 16, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Climate Change Weekly #332
August 15, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Many of my friends have long referred to environmentalists as “watermelons” — green on the outside, red on the inside.
August 15, 2019
By Anthony Watts
The media are abuzz over the first icy "casualty" of climate change: a small glacier in Iceland named Okjökull, also known as "OK."
August 15, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
For more than 20 years I’ve watched media outlets fail to accurately portray the debate surrounding climate change. Unfortunately, things are getting worse.
August 13, 2019
By Robert G. Holland
Over the past 15 years, the Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) has become the Little Engine That Could among school choice programs in the United States.
August 13, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Politicians everywhere should have to take a version of the Hippocratic Oath, swearing the laws they enact to solve problems won’t make the situation worse.
August 13, 2019
By Lindsey Stroud
Warren barely scratched the surface on the audacity of unelected and unaccountable executive agency officials who blatantly abuse their positions of power for their own gain.
August 13, 2019
By Christopher Talgo
News flash: Medicare and Social Security, the nation’s two largest entitlement programs, are on the fast track towards bankruptcy.
August 13, 2019
By Joe Barnett
Government paternalism consists not only of giving people things they didn’t pay for, but also in preventing people from making decisions that, in the benevolent judgment of superintending bureaucrats, aren’t in their best interest.
August 13, 2019
By Jim Lakely
NOTE: This article about 'skeptic' climate scientist Nir Shaviv was published and then quickly pulled from Forbes.com. We publish it here to save the trouble of using the Wayback Machine to read it. The Internet is Forever.
August 12, 2019
By Richard Ebeling
Social and economic crises, real and imagined, often seem to bring out the most wrongheaded thinking in matters of government policy.
August 12, 2019
By Steve Goreham
Modern transportation is amazing. Each day, millions of people fly, drive, or are transported across our world for business, pleasure or to see distant family members.
August 12, 2019
By Art Carden
A new paper forthcoming in the journal American Economic Review: Insights estimates the effect of trade with China on American consumers and shows us what we stand to lose if we don't end the trade war.
August 12, 2019
By Paul Driessen
FDA must no longer let organic food growers, manufacturers and sellers get away with lies.
August 6, 2019
By Larry Sand
The “Red for Ed” movement is becoming redder by the day.
August 6, 2019
By Lindsey Stroud
After banning the sale of flavored tobacco products, including menthol cigarettes and flavoring in e-cigarettes, San Francisco is snuffing out tobacco harm reduction again.
August 5, 2019
By James Taylor
Democratic presidential hopeful Jay Inslee’s recently announced climate plan would come at a very steep price, putting the average U.S. household on the hook for $75,000 over the next 10 years.
August 5, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
President Trump vowed to increase transparency concerning how federal agencies operate and impose rules.
August 5, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Climate Change Weekly #331
August 5, 2019
By Jim Lakely
Week of July 29, 2019
August 5, 2019
By Avik Roy
For generations, the prices hospitals charge patients with private insurance have been shrouded in secrecy.
August 5, 2019
By Robert G. Holland
Wouldn’t you think if someone had a problem with dodgeball being too rough for some kids, they would just say so? Talk it out.
August 2, 2019
By Kim-Lien Nguyen, M.D.
Among the endless metrics for assessing the quality of health care, one that is exceedingly important for measuring physician quality is on the chopping block.
July 31, 2019
By Larry Sand
When it comes to public charter schools and any meaningful education reform, the teachers unions are staunch reactionaries.
July 30, 2019
By Thomas A. Hemphill
The Business Roundtable, an influential association of leading U.S. CEOs working to promote a vibrant U.S. economy through sound public policy, published Reducing Regulatory Overlap in the 21st Century.
July 30, 2019
By Richard Ebeling
At any moment in time, the world seems to be going to hell in a handbasket.
July 29, 2019
By Jim Lakely
Week of July 22, 2019
July 25, 2019
By Larry Sand
Thanks to Kamala Harris and the state of Montana, school choice is back in the news.
July 25, 2019
By Richard Ebeling
It is never possible to know beforehand or with full certainty whether right ideas will win out in a particular place and at any particular time.
July 24, 2019
By Steve Goreham
The belief that changing light bulbs, driving electric cars, and erecting wind turbines can improve human health is as medieval as the belief that bloodletting can cure disease.