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Energy
July 26, 2016
GOP Issues Blueprint for Tax Reform
House Republicans—led by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Rep.
Environment
March 25, 2019
Bill Would Place 400,000 Acres of Colorado Off-Limits to Energy Production
A bill under consideration in Congress would re-designate more than 400,000 acres of existing federal land in Colorado in ways that would limit access, mining, and oil and gas production.
Climate Change
March 25, 2019
U.S. District Court Dismisses Kids’ Lawsuit Against Trump Climate Policies
A federal district judge in Philadelphia dismissed a lawsuit by two Pennsylvania boys and an environmental group challenging the Trump administration’s rollback of some Obama-era climate regulations.
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Environment
March 22, 2019
Expectations High for President’s Commission on Climate Security
Climate Change Weekly #318
Energy
March 22, 2019
Don’t Write Off the Internal Combustion Engine
Given the media coverage of Tesla, the Chevy Bolt and the Nissan Leaf, one might think electric vehicles are a recent invention. In fact, they have been around for more than a century.
Energy
March 22, 2019
Power Grid Serving 65 Million May be at Risk in East, Midwest
Electricity is the most important and convenient way to consume energy. Without it, we’d literally be living in the “Dark Ages.” However, we often forget that it takes energy to make energy.

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March 25, 2019
By Kenneth Artz
A bill under consideration in Congress would re-designate more than 400,000 acres of existing federal land in Colorado in ways that would limit access, mining, and oil and gas production.
March 25, 2019
By Bonner R. Cohen
A federal district judge in Philadelphia dismissed a lawsuit by two Pennsylvania boys and an environmental group challenging the Trump administration’s rollback of some Obama-era climate regulations.
March 22, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Climate Change Weekly #318
March 22, 2019
By Bernard (Bud) Weinstein
Given the media coverage of Tesla, the Chevy Bolt and the Nissan Leaf, one might think electric vehicles are a recent invention. In fact, they have been around for more than a century.
March 22, 2019
By Bernard (Bud) Weinstein
Electricity is the most important and convenient way to consume energy. Without it, we’d literally be living in the “Dark Ages.” However, we often forget that it takes energy to make energy.
March 22, 2019
By Bill Eastland
Few members of Congress voted for net spending cuts over the past decade
March 22, 2019
By Steve Goreham
Once again, meat consumption is under attack by progressive leaders. Politicians and the United Nations call on all of us to eat more plant-based foods and less meat and dairy products in the name of saving the planet.
March 22, 2019
By Art Carden
Baseball phenom Mike Trout has inked a truly remarkable deal with the Los Angeles Angels: over the next twelve years, the Angels will pay him $426.5 million, or about $100 million more than the Phillies will pay Bryce Harper over the next thirteen years.
March 22, 2019
By Sarah Lott
Medical entomologists have taken a significant step forward in combating the spread of malaria, the highly lethal mosquito-transmitted infectious disease.
March 22, 2019
By John Utley
We should not embrace energy socialism, which calls for the replacing of cheap, reliable fossil fuels with expensive, intermittent wind and solar power.
March 22, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
New Jersey state Rep. Hal Wirths says New Jersey's recently enacted rain tax is a symbol of all that it wrong with the state's business environment.
March 21, 2019
Texas’ current civil asset forfeiture laws are rated among the worst in the nation.
March 21, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
The U.S. Senate confirmed Andrew Wheeler as administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by a party-line vote of 52 in favor and 47 opposed, on February 28.
March 21, 2019
By Duggan Flanakin
The Donlin Gold project, a joint venture of Novagold Resources Alaska Inc. and Barrick Gold US Inc., is closer to becoming a reality with the state of Alaska having issued two critical permits.
March 20, 2019
By Linnea Lueken
A new study, “Global Warming Energy Restrictions Threaten U.S. National Security,” shows climate change is not a danger to U.S. national security.
March 20, 2019
By Joe Barnett
The United States has the strongest intellectual property protections in the world
March 19, 2019
By Ashley Herzog
The legislation would provide immunity from civil lawsuits by the perpetrators of violent crimes.
March 19, 2019
By Greg E. Walcher
Observing a monarch butterfly in the 1850s, Emily Dickinson wrote about its apparently aimless flitting, “Repairing everywhere, without design that I could trace, except to stray abroad on miscellaneous enterprise, the clovers understood.”
March 19, 2019
By Clifford Thies
When Congressze Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced the Green New Deal earlier this year, she said we had only 12 years to save the planet.
March 19, 2019
By Duggan Flanakin
A North Dakota judge rejected a challenge to a state permit issued to Meridian Energy Group in to begin construction of what would be the first new industrial crude oil refinery in the United States in nearly 40 years.
March 18, 2019
By Sarah Quinlan
'Red Flag' laws raise concerns about constitutional rights
March 18, 2019
By Billy Aouste
Week of March 11, 2019
March 18, 2019
By John Droz, Jr.
America absolutely needs outside expert review of climate claims used to oppose fossil fuels.
March 18, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Legislators in Maine have proposed two bills that could expand black bear hunting in the state.
March 18, 2019
By Jim Lakely, Tim Huelskamp, Ph.D.
Letter signed by more than 140 Organizations and Individuals Supports Plan Put Forward by Dr. William Happer at the National Security Council
March 15, 2019
Parents of students affected by school safety incidents could move their child immediately to a safe school
March 15, 2019
By Richard Ebeling
How many bureaucrats are there in the world? The global population currently numbers more than 7.5 billion people. Out of that number it is estimated that the global labor force equals almost 3.5 billion.
March 15, 2019
By Edmund Contoski
Gold buying rose spectacularly in 2018 led by the world's central banks, which increased their physical purchases by 651.5 tonnes.
March 15, 2019
By Bonner R. Cohen
A pending decision by the Washington, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals could lead to the premature closing of scores of coal-powered electricity plants across the country, potentially hampering the reliability of the nation’s electric power grid.
March 13, 2019
By Jeff Reynolds
civil asset forfeiture laws allow the police to confiscate property
March 12, 2019
By Seton Motley
One of the chimeras for which we eternally search in Washington, DC – is bipartisanship.
March 12, 2019
By Kenneth Artz
A California state court judge in San Diego ruled gray wolves will continue to be protected under the state’s Endangered Species Act.
March 11, 2019
By John Merrifield
Switzerland set the precedent for this type of policy
March 11, 2019
By Paul Driessen
Stop the anti-climate science totalitarians.
March 11, 2019
By Billy Aouste
Week of March 4, 2019
March 8, 2019
By H. Sterling Burnett
Climate Change Weekly #317
March 8, 2019
By Owen Macaulay
“Job loss is the number one unintended impact of minimum wage increases"
March 8, 2019
By John Droz, Jr.
Independent scientists must review alarmist “science” that is driving anti-fossil fuel policies.
March 8, 2019
By Arianna Wilkerson
A bill introduced in the Connecticut legislature would mandate climate change be taught to young children in government schools statewide.
March 7, 2019
By James Taylor
Marine fisheries data show New England lobstermen are benefiting from a new golden age of lobster, thanks in large part to a warming Earth.