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A Blueprint for Immigration Reform

February 1, 2013
By David North

According to this Backgrounder & Report, North argues that those interested in or advocating "comprehensive immigration reform" should examine the thoroughly researched, well-documented findings of a federal commission that spent more than five years —

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According to this Backgrounder & Report, North argues that those interested in or advocating "comprehensive immigration reform" should examine the thoroughly researched, well-documented findings of a federal commission that spent more than five years — and numerous hearings — dealing with exactly that subject.

The U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, created by Congress as part of the Immigration Act of 1990 had impressive credentials, access to millions in federal funds, and was served by a highly competent staff. It had four Democratic appointees and four Republican ones, and with three chairs who were, in turn, a then-member of the College of Cardinals, a former member of the U.S. House of Representative, and a former member of the president's cabinet. It was generally known as the Jordan Commission, named for the late Barbara Jordan, the powerful woman who served the longest period as the Commission's chairwoman. The Jordan Commission, unlike the current White House, took its time to do its work, and decided, unanimously, that there was no need for an alien legalization program. Its work was summed up in these words:

The credibility of immigration policy can be measured by a simple yardstick: people who should get in, do get in; people who should not get in are kept out; and people who are judged deportable are required to leave.

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Immigration