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ACLP GONs Update

December 31, 2016
By Charles M. Davidson, Michael J. Santorelli

This policy brief, published by New York Law School’s Advanced Communications Law & Policy Institute evaluates the current status of several local and state government-owned network (GONs) projects.

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This policy brief, published by New York Law School’s Advanced Communications Law & Policy Institute and written by Institute directors Charles M. Davidson and Michael J. Santorelli, evaluates the current status of several local and state government-owned network (GONs) projects.

Supporters of putting the government into the internet service provider business claim super-fast internet builds are needed to “future-proof” taxpayer investments and promote economic activities, Davidson and Santorelli write.

“GON  advocates  continue  to  promote  gigabit fever  across  the  country  as  they attempt  to convince local  officials,  residents,  and  small businesses  that  they  need  such  super-fast connectivity  now,” Davidson and Santorelli write. “To that end, assertions about the relationship between gigabit speeds and economic gains abound even though there is no evidence that such a relationship exists. Arguments that the networks that can deliver such speeds—those built with fiber—are ‘future proof’ also continue to be made despite the fact that   no communications technology has ever proven to be immune to the demands of consumers and the creative destruction of ceaseless technological innovation.”