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Acute Myocardial Infarction Mortality Before and After State-wide Smoking Bans

September 16, 2011

A number of studies of small populations conclude there is an immediate and significant reduction in the number of persons who die from heart attacks after smoking bans are put into effect.

two tumblers with liquor and a lit cigarrette

A number of studies of small populations conclude there is an immediate and significant reduction in the number of persons who die from heart attacks after smoking bans are put into effect.

In “Acute Myocardial Infarction Mortality Before and After State-wide Smoking Bans,” researchers Brad Rodu and Nicholas Peiper of University of Louisville and Phillip Cole of Univeristy of Alabama write, “Our results are consistent with a recent analysis finding that smoking bans were not associated with short-term declines in mortality or hospital admissions for myocardial infarction or other diseases.”

Author
Brad Rodu is a senior fellow of The Heartland Institute and holds the Endowed Chair in Tobacco Harm Reduction Research at the University of Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center.
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