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Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels - Summary for Policymakers

October 5, 2018

In this new volume, 117 scientists, economists, and other experts address and refute IPCC’s claim that the impacts of climate change on human well-being and the natural environment justify dramatic reductions in the use of fossil fuels

CCRIIc Fossil Fuels

Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels, produced by the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), assesses the costs and benefits of the use of fossil fuels1 by reviewing scientific and economic literature on organic chemistry, climate science, public health, economic history, human security, and theoretical studies based on integrated assessment models (IAMs) and cost-benefit analysis (CBA). It is the fifth volume in the Climate Change Reconsidered series and, like the preceding volumes, it focuses on research overlooked or ignored by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (see Idso and Singer, 2009; Idso et al., 2011, 2013, 2014).

In its 2013 volume titled Climate Change Reconsidered II: Physical Science, NIPCC refuted the scientific basis of IPCC’s claim that dangerous human interference with the climate system is occurring. In its 2014 volume titled Climate Change Reconsidered II: Biological Impacts, NIPCC addressed and refuted IPCC’s claim that climate change negatively affects plants, wildlife, and human health.

In this new volume, 117 scientists, economists, and other experts address and refute IPCC’s claim that the impacts of climate change on human well-being and the natural environment justify dramatic reductions in the use of fossil fuels. Specifically, the NIPCC authors critique two recent IPCC reports: Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, the Working Group II contribution to IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), and Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change, the Working Group III contribution to AR5 (IPCC, 2014a, 2014b).

The organization of this Summary for Policymakers tracks the organization of the full report. Citations to supporting research and documentation are scant for want of space but can be found at the end of the document. Nearly 3,000 references appear in the full report.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part I: Foundations

1. Environmental Economics

2. Climate Science

Part II: Benefits of Fossil Fuels

3. Human Prosperity

4. Human Health

5. Environmental Benefits

Part III: Costs of Fossil Fuels

6. Air Quality

7. Human Security

8. Cost-benefit Analysis

Conclusion

References

Authors, Contributors, and Reviewers

Author
Roger Bezdek, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized energy analyst, president of MISI, and a policy advisor to The Heartland Institute.
media@heartland.org
Author
Dr. Craig D. Idso is the coauthor, with Dr. Robert M. Carter and Dr. S. Fred Singer, of Climate Change Reconsidered: 2011 Interim Report of the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) (The Heartland Institute, 2011), and with Dr.
media@heartland.org
Author
David Legates, Ph.D., is professor of climatology in the Department of Geography at the University of Delaware.
legates@udel.edu
Author
Dr. S. Fred Singer was among the first and is still the most prominent scientist in the world speaking out against global warming alarmism.
singer@sepp.org