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Immigrants in the United States, 2010: A Profile of America's Foreign-Born Population

August 1, 2012
By Steven A. Camarota

In this detailed policy report and Backgrounder, Steven Camarota looks at the latest Census Bureau data from 2010 and 2011. This report provides a picture of the more than 50 million immigrants (legal and illegal) and their U.S.

population

In this detailed policy report and Backgrounder, Steven Camarota looks at the latest Census Bureau data from 2010 and 2011.  This report provides a picture of the more than 50 million immigrants (legal and illegal) and their U.S.-born children (under 18) in the United States by country of birth, state, and legal status. One of the most important findings is that immigration has dramatically increased the size of the nation’s low-income population; however, there is great variation among immigrants by sending country and region. Moreover, many immigrants make significant progress the longer they live in the country. But even with this progress, immigrants who have been in the United States for 20 years are much more likely to live in poverty, lack health insurance, and access the welfare system than are native-born Americans. The large share of immigrants arriving as adults with relatively little education partly explains this phenomenon.

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Immigration