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Majority of Broadcast Meteorologists Skeptical of Global Warming Crisis

April 1, 2010

A majority of broadcast meteorologists are skeptical of alarmist global warming claims and find the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change untrustworthy, reports a new survey from the George Mason University Center for Climate Change

A majority of broadcast meteorologists are skeptical of alarmist global warming claims and find the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change untrustworthy, reports a new survey from the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication.

Funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, George Mason researchers surveyed all broadcast television member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the National Weather Association (NWA). To receive an AMS seal of approval members are required to have a degree in meteorology. To receive an NWA seal of approval members must demonstrate sound meteorological knowledge in a written examination and be approved by fellow broadcast meteorologists. Of the 571 broadcast meteorologists surveyed, 55 percent held an AMS seal of approval and 33 percent held an NWA seal of approval.

According to the survey of broadcast meteorologists:

• 63% believe global warming is caused mostly by natural causes, and only 31% believe humans are primarily responsible

• 44% trust the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), while 56% find IPCC untrustworthy

• Only 24% see any evidence of climate change in their local weather patterns

• Less than half (42%) are very worried or somewhat worried about global warming

• Only 20% believe global warming will cause a great deal of harm to future generations

• Only 23% believe global warming should be a high or very high priority for the President and Congress. 48% believe it should be a low priority, and 29% believe it should be a medium priority

• Roughly 90% believe they are fairly well informed or very well informed about the scientific causes and consequences of global warming

• Only 33% say most scientists think global warming is happening, while 61% say there is a lot of disagreement among scientists about whether or not global warming is happening

• 42% said the recent Climategate scandal has made them more certain that global warming is not happening

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Author
James Taylor is Director of the Arthur B. Robinson Center for Climate and Environmental Policy at The Heartland Institute.
jtaylor@heartland.org