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Real-World Effectiveness Of E-Cigarettes When Used To Aid Smoking Cessation: A Cross-Sectional Population Study

May 12, 2014
By Jamie Brown, Emma Beard, Daniel Kotz, Susan Michie, and Robert West

This paper, written by University College London health researchers Jamie Brown, Emma Beard, Daniel Kotz, Susan Michie, and Robert West, examines the effectiveness of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids, in comparison to the effectiveness of

two tumblers with liquor and a lit cigarrette

This paper, written by University College London health researchers Jamie Brown, Emma Beard, Daniel Kotz, Susan Michie, and Robert West, examines the effectiveness of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids, in comparison to the effectiveness of over-the-counter nicotine patches and “cold turkey” methods, as reported by smokers attempting to break the habit.

“A total of 6134 respondents reported a most recent quit attempt in the last 12 months that was either unaided or supported by NRT bought over-the-counter, e-cigarettes or both. Those using both were excluded as were those using a prescription stop-smoking medication or face-to-face behavioral support in combination with either NRT bought over-the-counter or e-cigarettes,” they write. “Thus, the study population consisted of 5863 smokers who had made an attempt to quit in the previous year, of whom 7.9 percent had used e-cigarettes, 32.8 percent had used NRT bought over-the-counter and 59.3% had used no aid to cessation.”

“Respondents who reported having used an e-cigarette in their most recent quit attempt were more likely to report still not smoking than those who used NRT bought over-the-counter or nothing,” the researchers write. “This difference remained after adjusting for time since the quit attempt started, year of the survey, age, gender, social grade, abrupt versus gradual quitting, prior quit attempts in the same year and a measure of nicotine dependence.”