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State of Fear: Creating Environmental Disasters

February 1, 2005
By Paul Messino

Most Michael Crichton novels are decorated with beautiful women, page-turning action sequences, roller-coaster-sized plot twists, and extraordinarily heroic protagonists pitted against equally dastardly villains.

Most Michael Crichton novels are decorated with beautiful women, page-turning action sequences, roller-coaster-sized plot twists, and extraordinarily heroic protagonists pitted against equally dastardly villains. Crichton’s latest novel, State of Fear, is not extraordinary, at least not in these respects. What does separate this novel from its literary cousins is its truism for the modern world.

Almost unequivocally, this novel is a must read for anyone even remotely interested in the global warming debate. Told in a style that is both captivating and entertaining, State of Fear will leave the reader second-guessing the hearsay of global warming alarmists. But, even beyond this crucial gift, Crichton truly gives the reader a glimpse into the bureaucratic, social, and legal conundrum of the post-modern world.

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