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The School Lunch Program With an Unappetizing Report Card

June 29, 2015

Some five years after passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the law may not be achieving either end.

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Some five years after passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the law may not be achieving either end. The signature policy of first lady Michelle Obama attempts to combat childhood obesity and hunger by providing healthier school meals, however, as Congress prepares to reauthorize the program, which expires in September, lawmakers must address complaints of inedible meals, food waste and misspent funds.


The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act is laughdable, but needs to have more flexibility, Stier said. The program funds a number of child-nutrition programs including the National School Lunch Program, which costs $12 billion a year -- plus $3 billion for breakfast programs -- and serves nearly 32 million children, about 45% of the total U.S. youth population.

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Health Care
Author
Jeff Stier is a Senior Fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research in Washington, D.C., and heads its Risk Analysis Division. Mr.
jeffstier@gmail.com