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The Scientific Case for Vacating the EPA’s Carbon Dioxide Endangerment Finding

April 21, 2020

The EPA's carbon dioxide endangerment finding is based on climate models which research has shown to be fundamentally flawed, providing no justifiable basis for enacting climate policies.

From the study:

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) 2009 “Endangerment Finding” from carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases grants the agency a legal mandate that can have profound and far-reaching effects.

All prospective climate impacts in the Endangerment Finding are generated by computer models that, with one exception, made systematic and dramatic errors over the climatically critical tropics. Best scientific practice would be to emphasize the working model, which has less warming in it than all of the others.

New research compares what has been observed to what is forecast, and finds that warming in this century will be modest—near the lowest extreme of the prospective range given by the United Nations.

This constellation of unreliable models, poor scientific practice, and exaggerated estimates of the Social Cost of Carbon argue consistently and cogently for the EPA to reopen and then vacate its endangerment finding from carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

Author
Patrick J. Michaels is a Senior Research Fellow for Policy and Economic Development at George Mason University.
pmichaels@cato.org
Author
Kevin D. Dayaratna is Senior Statistician and Research Programmer in The Heritage Foundation’s Center for Data Analysis (CDA) and a Policy Advisor with the Heartland Institute.