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UN Climate Delegates Failing Everyone, Developed and Developing Alike

November 21, 2013

Representatives from developing countries [at COP 19] asserted that adaptation efforts are overwhelmed by the supposed increase in extreme weather events, and so the FCCC must therefore address loss and damage as a standalone issue.

polar ice caps

Representatives from developing countries [at COP 19] asserted that adaptation efforts are overwhelmed by the supposed increase in extreme weather events, and so the FCCC must therefore address loss and damage as a standalone issue.

The proper response should have been easy for representatives of developed nations. They should have again highlighted the IPCC’s SREX conclusions, and explained that in their September 2013 assessment report the IPCC had only “low confidence” that damaging increases will occur in tropical cyclones (typhoons and hurricanes) due to global warming. Developed country representatives should have also cited the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) report, also released in September, which asserted:

In no case has a convincing relationship been established between warming over the past 100 years and increases in any of these extreme events.

… The time has also come for nations to start withdrawing from the FCCC, which is allowed under the convention’s Article 25. The idea that human activity is responsible for dangerous climate change has been debunked by thousands of peer-reviewed science papers reported on in the NIPCC’s reports. The original premise of the FCCC makes even less sense now than it did in 1992.

Yes, climate change and extreme weather events are a constant threat to human societies and nature alike. But the proper response is to prepare for these phenomena as best we can, while continuing to fund scientific research so that someday we may be able predict what, when, and where extreme events will happen. Stopping such phenomena from occurring, the main focus of today’s pointless and expensive UN FCCC meetings, is science fiction.

[First published at PJ Media.]

[Read more about the Nongovernmental Panel on Climate Change at ClimateChangeReconsidered.org.]

Author
Tom Harris is executive director of the International Climate Science Coalition
tom.harris@climatescienceinternational.net @TomHarrisICSC
Author
Madhav Khandekar is a former research scientist from Environment Canada and is presently on the editorial board of the Journal of Natural Hazards (Kluwer).
mkhandekar@rogers.com