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Publications

Health Care
June 10, 2020
States are about to be hit by a Medicaid Tidal Wave
This report describes the fiscal burden states will face from anticipated Medicaid growth from the recession and congressional restrictions on enrollment control.
Health Care
April 22, 2020
Congress's Medicaid funding increase creates massive legal uncertainty for states during COVID-19 Crisis
The report by the Foundation for Government Accountability shows how new funding could restrict states from running Medicaid as they see fit.
Health Care
April 1, 2020
Is Medicaid Expansion Worth It?
The report reviews three economic studies to determine Medicaid expansion impact on mortality and health outcomes.
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Health Care
February 26, 2020
Competitor's Veto: State Certificate of need Laws Violate State Prohibitions on Monopolies
This paper reviews the constitutional issues involved with certificate of need laws and argues how such laws allow governments to establish monopolies.
Health Care
June 26, 2019
The Arizona Medicaid Expansion Experience
The study debunks the idea that employer insurance plans are subsidizing the uninsured through cost shifting.
Health Care
June 12, 2019
Hospital Network Competition and Adverse Selection: Evidence From the Massachusetts health Insurance Exchange
Mark Shepard looks at date in the Boston health care market to show how insurers are restricting their networks.

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Policy Studies
June 10, 2020
By Nicholas Horton, Jonathan Ingram
This report describes the fiscal burden states will face from anticipated Medicaid growth from the recession and congressional restrictions on enrollment control.
April 22, 2020
By Foundation for Government Accountability
The report by the Foundation for Government Accountability shows how new funding could restrict states from running Medicaid as they see fit.
April 1, 2020
By David Balat, Brian Blase
The report reviews three economic studies to determine Medicaid expansion impact on mortality and health outcomes.
February 26, 2020
By Christina Sandefur
This paper reviews the constitutional issues involved with certificate of need laws and argues how such laws allow governments to establish monopolies.
June 26, 2019
The study debunks the idea that employer insurance plans are subsidizing the uninsured through cost shifting.
June 12, 2019
Mark Shepard looks at date in the Boston health care market to show how insurers are restricting their networks.
June 4, 2019
Chris Pope of the Manhattan Institute makes the case of how so-called "short-term" insurance plans are not "junk insurance" and how expansion of access will not leave the federal government with a bigger bill to take care of the sick.
May 28, 2019
The study looks at what health care innovations under Section 1332 waivers would be worthwhile for the State of Georgia.
March 22, 2018
By Frederick D. Palmer, Isaac Orr
The eight-year tenure of the Obama administration inflicted intentional, serious damage on the country’s capacity to provide the electricity that runs our computers, heats, cools, and lights our homes, powers our factories, and fuels our economy.
March 8, 2018
By Frederick D. Palmer, Isaac Orr
Why would anyone scrap perfectly good high-quality computers, smartphones, or cars for more costly, lower quality, and less reliable products? Yet, that is exactly what policymakers do when they push coal-fired power plants into early retirement.
February 28, 2018
By Jay Lehr
This Heartland Policy Study critiques and rebuts the “Climate Science Special Report” released by the U.S. Global Change Research Program in November 2017. It refutes the earlier report’s assumption that “the science is settled” and exposes its biases.
February 15, 2018
By Isaac Orr, Frederick D. Palmer
Coal has been a mainstay of economic growth and human well-being in the United States for more than a century.
February 1, 2018
By Isaac Orr, Frederick D. Palmer
More than 250 coal-fired power plants in the United States have been retired since 2010, and more are scheduled to be retired. The premature retirement of these coal-fired units poses a threat to the country’s electricity supply.
September 12, 2017
By OECD Publishing
This 2017 study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development provides information and trends on education.
April 2, 2017
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
This Heartland Policy Study examines the best available scientific data on the effects of industrial sand mining on air quality, concluding those operations do not pose a threat to human health or the environment.
December 5, 2016
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
Industrial silica sand mining is governed by a comprehensive regulatory apparatus established to protect human and environmental health from the potential impacts of all industrial activities, including industrial sand mining.
December 1, 2016
By The College Board
A report by The College Board examining college and university costs in 2016-17, including how prices have changed, and variance between types of institutions, states, and regions.
August 19, 2016
By Isaac Orr
In an article published at The Nation, 350.org founder Bill McKibben portrays methane as a dangerous greenhouse gas. Here's why he's wrong.
June 1, 2016
By James Golsan
Senate Bill 127, along with its companion, House Bill 936, is one of several bills put forward this session to expand the existing charter school cap in Texas. Th ough the tenants of SB 127 are simple, this is important legislation for Texas.
March 30, 2016
By Nick Dranias
As the federal debt approaches $18 trillion, a balanced budget amendment has emerged as one of few viable options to curb government spending. The Article V process for amending the U.S. Constitution, however, is long and tedious.
February 16, 2016
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
The “social” impact of sand-mining operations, including their impact on land use, scenic beauty, and property values, can be a sensitive topic. Emotion and opinion, rather than technical facts and scientific data, tend to dominate the discussion.
September 18, 2015
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
As many as 9,000 non-metallic mines operate in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin – approximately one mine for every 3,000 residents. Until recently, those mines have operated without opposition.
June 1, 2015
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
Second in a series#137 (May 2015) Environmental Impacs of Industrial Silica Sand (Frac Sand) MiningHydraulic fracturing for oil and natural gas production has dramatically increased the demand for industrial silica sand, known as “frac sand,” available
May 11, 2015
By Isaac Orr, Mark Krumenacher
The rate of silica sand mining in the United States has increased in recent years, due in large part to the tremendous growth in hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas using horizontal drilling techniques.
April 22, 2015
By Abigail S. Friedman
Understanding electronic cigarettes’ effect on tobacco smoking is a central economic and policyissue. This paper examines the causal impact of e-cigarette availability on conventional cigaretteuse by adolescents.
April 20, 2015
By Nick Dranias
Being able to speak freely and donate money anonymously has a long and distinguished history in the U.S. The Declaration of Independence, the campaigns for approval of the U.S.
March 19, 2015
By Diane Bast, Matthew Glans, Gary MacDougal
Most state governments can improve the effectiveness of their efforts to help those in poverty. This 50-state report card offers policymakers and the public a roadmap for how it can be done.
March 19, 2015
By Diane Bast, Matthew Glans, Gary MacDougal
In the nearly two decades since the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 was signed into law, the nation has seen a major reduction in the number of welfare recipients.
June 23, 2014
By Paul Driessen
Pressure from the United Nations, U.S.
November 18, 2013
By Isaac Orr
Vast reserves of oil and natural gas have been known to exist in shale formations throughout the United States for decades, but extracting these resources was not economically viable until the advent of “smart drilling” technology – the combination of
June 20, 2013
By John Nothdurft
June 20, 2013 – The 518 taxing districts within Cook County have a combined “financial burden” of almost $34 billion - an average of $17,147 per Cook County household - according to a study released today by The Heartland Institute and Truth in
April 9, 2012
By National Taxpayers Union
As the 21st Century evolves and our economy begins to recover, there is near-universal agreement on the importance of expanding Americans’ access to high-speed Internet service.
October 1, 2011
By New Jersey Department of the Treasury
A non-partisan study conducted by the New Jersey Department of the Treasury studies existing research on the effects of state taxes on migration.
June 27, 2011
By Eli Lehrer
Each of the past four years, The Heartland Institute has released a report that asks fundamental questions about the nation’s property and casualty insurance regulatory environment.
June 15, 2011
By Dean Stansel
Florida Gulf Coast University Associate Professor of Economics Dean Stansel studies migration and taxation data for 100 American metropolitian areas, finding statistically significant correlations between rates of taxation and individuals' choices to
June 1, 2011
By John Garen
John Garen, professor in economics at the University of Kentucky and adjunct scholar at the Bluegrass Institute, writes an extensive study on the expansion of Medicaid in his state.
December 10, 2010
By James Moss
As unions begin to target charter schools, James Moss in his doctoral dissertation for the University of Southern California describes the effects a unionizing workforce has on charter teachers, administrators, and students' educations.
December 1, 2010
By Robert Natleson
Rob Natleson, senior fellow of the Independence Institute, presents his first policy study relating to amending the Constitution of the United States through an Article V convention.
October 1, 2010
By Herbert J. Walberg & Marc Oestreich
A Nation at Risk pointed out more than 25 years ago that the poor quality of public schools in the United States is a threat to the continuing prosperity of the country.
September 24, 2010
By Peter Ferrara
Earlier this year, Congress passed and President Barack Obama signed into law the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.